#VaxUpMs Campaign
MSMA created the #VaxUpMS campaign to encourage Mississippians to ‘give it a shot’ and ‘vaxup,’ as the state’s health leaders are confronting this pandemic. Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will help protect yourself, your loved ones and others around you. Protection from COVID-19 is critically important because for some people, COVID-19 can cause severe illness or death.

While The Mississippi Department of Health encourages all Mississippians to take the opportunity to get vaccinated, the message still stands; continue to practice social distancing, wash your hands, and do not let your guards or masks down.


WHO CAN RECEIVE THE VACCINE IN MISSISSIPPI?

As of March 16, 2021, Mississippi is offering COVID-19 immunizations to everyone.

HOW DO COVID-19 VACCINES WORK?

COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness. Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection. But with all types of vaccines, the body is left with a supply of “memory” T-lymphocytes as well as B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus in the future.

It typically takes a few weeks after vaccination for the body to produce T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes. Therefore, it is possible that a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and then get sick because the vaccine did not have enough time to provide protection.

Sometimes after vaccination, the process of building immunity can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building immunity.

HOW DO I SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT?

There are two convenient ways to schedule a vaccination appointment:
1. Click Here
2. Call 877-978-6453

The state will continue to offer COVID-19 vaccination appointments at MSDH drive through sites based on the number of vaccines allocated to the state of Mississippi each week by the federal government. The number of vaccine doses Mississippi receives varies from week to week. This impacts appointment availability.

To make sure you receive the same type of vaccine, please schedule your second dose appointment at the same location where you received your first dose. Second dose appointments will be made on-site, after you receive your first dose. 

If you’ve already received your first dose but have not made a second dose appointment, call the COVID19 Hotline (877-978-6453) to schedule your second dose appointment. 

COMMON SIDE EFFECTS 

COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. These side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Some people have no side effects.

- On the arm where you received the shot
- pain
- redness
- swelling

- Throughout the rest of your body
- tiredness
- headache
- muscle pain
- chills
- fever
- nausea

TO COMBAT SIDE EFFECTS
- use or exercise the arm where you received the shot
- apply a clean, cool, wet washcloth over the insertion area
- drink plenty of fluids
- dress lightly

FAQ

Can a COVID-19 vaccine make me sick with COVID-19?
No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines or COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

There are several different types of vaccines in development. All of them teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building


If I have already had COVID-19 and recovered, do I still need to get vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine?
Yes. You should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. That’s because experts do not yet know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Even if you have already recovered from COVID-19, it is possible—although rare—that you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 again.

Is it safe for me to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I would like to have a baby one day?
Yes. People who want to get pregnant in the future may receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Based on current knowledge, experts believe that COVID-19 vaccines are unlikely to pose a risk to a person trying to become pregnant in the short or long term. Scientists study every vaccine carefully for side effects immediately and for years afterward.  The COVID-19 vaccines are being studied carefully now and will continue to be studied for many years, similar to other vaccines.


Will a COVID-19 vaccine alter my DNA?
No. COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way.

Messenger RNA vaccines—also called mRNA vaccines—are the first COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States. mRNA vaccines teach our cells how to make a protein that triggers an immune response. The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept. This means the mRNA cannot affect or interact with our DNA in any way. Instead, COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop immunity to disease.


Will a COVID-19 vaccination protect me from getting sick with COVID-19?
Yes. COVID-19 vaccination works by teaching your immune system how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19, and this protects you from getting sick with COVID-19.

After getting a COVID-19 vaccine, will I test positive for COVID-19 on a viral test?
No. Neither the recently authorized and recommended vaccines nor the other COVID-19 vaccines currently in clinical trials in the United States can cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection. 

SPREAD THE WORD

Help us spread the word about the COVID-19 vaccine, by clicking the link below, downloading a graphic and sharing it to your social media. Don't forget to use the hashtags #VaxUpMs and #GiveItAShot.

CLICK HERE

* all information was gathered from The Center for Disease Control and Prevention *